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The American Medical Association recently released Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) 2009. New, deleted, and revised codes went into effect Jan. 1. The biggest change to hospitalist billing involves prolonged care codes (99354-99357). CPT 2009 descriptor revisions make it possible for physicians to contribute non-face-to-face time toward prolonged care services.

Inpatient Prolonged Care

Previous versions of CPT defined code 99356 as the first hour of prolonged physician [inpatient] services requiring direct (face-to-face) patient contact beyond the usual services (reportable after the initial 30 minutes); and 99357 for each additional 30 minutes of prolonged [inpatient] care beyond the first hour (reportable after the first 15 minutes of each additional segment). CPT 2009 has changed prolonged care guidelines to be more consistent with other time-based services: all unit/floor time spent by the physician is considered when reporting 99356 and 99357.1

As with most other evaluation and management services, a face-to-face encounter still must occur. In addition to the time associated with the face-to-face encounter, count the time associated with all other physician activities occurring on the unit/floor (e.g., reviewing images, obtaining information involving overnight events, discussing management options with the family) directed toward an individual patient. The cumulative time spent by the billing provider on a single calendar day is considered for billing. Time spent by someone other than the billing provider cannot be credited toward prolonged care.

As example, a physician cares for a 65-year-old male with uncontrolled diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and congestive heart failure. Early in the day, the physician rounds, spending a total of 20 minutes reviewing the overnight course of events on the unit, re-confirming the patient history, and performing an exam with the patient. Anticipating the patient’s needs, the physician discusses post-discharge options and care with the patient and his family for 45 minutes. After the discussion, the physician spends an additional 30 minutes relaying information to the team and coordinating care. Merely reporting the highest-level subsequent hospital care service (99233), does not capture the physician’s cumulative effort. It only would account for 40 of the 95 minutes spent throughout the day. In order to capture the remaining 55 minutes, the physician reports 99356 on the same claim form as 99233.

Table 1 click for large version

click for large version

Do not report prolonged care codes on a separate claim form. Prolonged care codes do not represent an independent service. These codes are reported along with a primary service. They must appear as a separate line item on the claim form, which includes a code representing the primary service. For prolonged care in the inpatient setting, the primary service must be initial hospital care (99221-99223), subsequent hospital care (99231-99233), inpatient consultations (99251-99255), or nursing facility services (99304-99318). Additional examples of billable prolonged care services are in Section 30.6.15.1I of the Medicare manual, available at www.cms.hhs.gov/manuals/ downloads/clm104c12.pdf.

Code of the Month: Prolonged Care

99354: Prolonged physician service in the office or other outpatient setting requiring direct (face-to-face) patient contact beyond the usual service; first hour (list separately in addition to code for office or other outpatient evaluation and management service).

99355: Prolonged physician service in the office or other outpatient setting requiring direct (face-to-face) patient contact beyond the usual service; each additional 30 minutes (list separately in addition to code for prolonged physician service).

99356: Prolonged physician service in the inpatient setting, requiring unit/floor time beyond the usual service; first hour (list separately in addition to code for inpatient evaluation and management service).

99357: Prolonged physician service in the inpatient setting, requiring unit/floor time beyond the usual service; each additional 30 minutes (list separately in addition to code for prolonged physician service).

Threshold Time

Prolonged care guidelines refer to “threshold” time. Threshold time requires the physician to exceed the time requirements associated with the “primary” codes before reporting prolonged care. Table 1 identifies the typical times associated with inpatient services qualifying for prolonged care. The physician must exceed the typical time by a minimum of 30 minutes. (For example, 99232 + 99356 = 25 minutes + 30 minutes = 55 total minutes). Additionally, the physician must document the total time spent during the face-to-face portion of the encounter, and the additional unit or floor time in one cumulative note or in separate notes representing the physician services provided to the patient throughout the day.

Prolonged Outpatient Services

Prolonged care (99354-99355) provided to outpatients remains unchanged. Physicians only report personally provided face-to-face time with the patient. Time spent by other staff members does not count toward prolonged care.

As with prolonged inpatient care, report 99354 and 99355 in addition to a primary service code. The companion outpatient codes are outpatient/office visits (99201-99205 or 99212–99215), outpatient consultation (99241–99245), domiciliary/custodial care (99324–99328 or 99334–99337), and home services (99341-99350). Hospitalists more often use outpatient prolonged care with office consultation codes for services provided in the emergency department, as appropriate.

Do not report 99354 or 99355 with observation care (99217-99220) or emergency department visits (99281-99288), since these service categories typically require prolonged periods of physician monitoring, thereby prohibiting use of prolonged care codes. As with inpatient-prolonged care, the concept of threshold time exists. Refer to Table 2 (pg. 25) for the typical threshold times associated with office consultation codes.

Table 2 click for large version

click for large version

Medicare Consideration

Although CPT has offered revisions to this code, Medicare guidelines remain unchanged. The Medicare Claims Processing Manual still states: “In the case of prolonged hospital services, time spent reviewing charts or discussion of a patient with house medical staff and not with direct face-to-face contact with the patient, or waiting for test results, for changes in the patient’s condition, for end of a therapy, or for use of facilities, cannot be billed as prolonged services.”4 It is yet to be determined if the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will issue a transmittal to revise the current description in the processing manual. Physicians and staff may access past and present transmittal information at www.cms.hhs.gov/ Transmittals/.

As always, be sure to query payers about prolonged care services, since some non-Medicare insurers may not recognize these codes.

Modifier 21

Modifier 21 has been deleted from the CPT. Modifier 21 was appended to an appropriate visit code (e.g., 99232-21) when the face-to-face or floor/unit service(s) provided is prolonged or otherwise greater than usually required for the highest level of evaluation and management service within a given category.5 Since the descriptors for codes 99354-99357 have been revised to more consistently reflect the description formerly associated with modifier 21, there is no need to maintain its existence. Additionally, Medicare and most other payers did not recognize this modifier.

Code This Case

Question: A newly diagnosed diabetic requires extensive counseling regarding lifestyle changes, medication regime, the disease process, as well as coordination of care for outpatient programs and services. The hospitalist reviews some of the pertinent information with the patient (15 minutes), and performs an abbreviated service (problem-focused history and exam). The attending physician asks the resident to assist him with the remaining counseling efforts and coordination of care (30 minutes).

Each physician documents his or her portion of the service. What visit level can the hospitalist report?

Answer: When two billing providers (i.e., two attending physicians) from the same group practice split the threshold time (e.g., physician A provided morning rounds, and physician B spoke with the family in the afternoon), only one physician can report the cumulative service, since 99356 must be reported on the same invoice as the primary visit code (e.g., 99231).6

The example above involves the resident’s time as well as the attending physician’s time. Documentation must be very clear to demonstrate the attending physician actively participated in the entire 45-minute service. Otherwise, only the attending may report the amount of time he actually spent providing the service.

Billing options for this scenario can vary. When the physician performs and documents the key components of history, exam, and decision making for the primary encounter, report 99231 (0.76 physician work relative value units; $33.90) and 99356 (1.71 physician work relative value units; $76.46) for the cumulative service. Alternatively, in those evaluation and management services for which the [primary] code level is selected based on time alone (i.e., history and exam was not performed or required), prolonged services may only be reported with the highest code level in that family of codes as the companion code.7

Therefore, this 45-minute service may be reported as 99233 (2.0 physician work relative value units; $86.92) since more than half of the total visit time was dedicated to counseling/coordi-nation of care (see Section 30.6.1B-C available at www. cms.hhs.gov/manuals/ downloads/clm104c12.pdf for additional information on billing for counseling/coordination of care time).

If a payer does not recognize prolonged care codes, only the latter billing option is possible. TH

Carol Pohlig is a billing and coding expert with the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia. She is on the faculty of SHM’s inpatient coding course.

References

1. Beebe M, Dalton J, Espronceda M, Evans D, Glenn R. Current Procedural Terminology Professional Edition. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association, 2008; 25-26.

2. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Medicare Claims Processing Manual: Chapter 12, Section 30.6.15.1G. www.cms.hhs.gov/manuals/downloads/ clm104c12.pdf. Accessed November 19, 2008.

3. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Medicare Claims Processing Manual: Chapter 12, Section 30.6.15.1F. www.cms.hhs.gov/manuals/dowloads/ clm104c12.pdf. Accessed November 19, 2008.

4. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Medicare Claims Processing Manual: Chapter 12, Section 30.6.15.1C. www.cms.hhs.gov/manuals/ downloads/clm104c12.pdf. Accessed November 19, 2008.

5. Beebe M, Dalton J, Espronceda M, Evans D, Glenn R. Current Procedural Terminology Professional Edition. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association, 2008; 457.

6. Pohlig, C. Bill by time spent on case. The Hospitalist. Jul 2008;19.

7. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Medicare Claims Processing Manual: Chapter 12, Section 30.6.15.1H. www.cms.hhs.gov/manuals/downloads/ clm104c12.pdf. Accessed November 19, 2008.

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