Urban Legends

Jeff Glasheen, MD, SFHM

Registration for the Focused Practice in Hospital Medicine (FPHM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) through the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) opened March 15. Since then, hundreds of board-certified IM physicians have registered to complete their MOC through the FPHM. For those of you who haven’t gone through MOC yet, it is required every 10 years in order to maintain your board certification.

As a member of the committee tasked with helping ABIM develop the FPHM, as well as write the FPHM examination, I’m frequently asked questions about this process, especially since FPHM was featured on the May 2010 cover of this magazine. Some of the questions stem from the perplexity associated with this significant change to the MOC process. Others arise from misinformation and apprehension, and could rightly be called urban legends. Here is a sample of those questions, with their respective veracity.

Does This Certification Mean I’ll No Longer be an Internist?

No. I clearly remember the day I found out I passed the ABIM certification exam; it represented the culmination of years of work, the pinnacle. All those long hours of study, late-night admissions, and exam preparation had finally paid off. I was a board-certified internist! I cherish my board certification and hold it out as recognition of my mastery of the field of IM. As such, I certainly understand the concern that entering the FPHM will somehow result in “losing” IM certification. However, this just isn’t true.

First, all diplomates—ABIM terminology for those enrolled in the board (re)certification process—in the FPHM are certified as internists. This is simply, as the name suggests, recognition of focused practice in HM—the core certification is still in IM. We are still internists—just internists who have focused our practice to hospital care. The formal board designation will read: ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine with a Focused Practice in Hospital Medicine.

The FPHM is certification in internal medicine by the ABIM. This carries the same weight and meaning as the regular internal medicine MOC. All credentialing boards that recognize the ABIM MOC in IM will recognize the FPHM.

Will Hospital Credentialing Boards Recognize This Certification?

Yes. The FPHM is certification in IM by the ABIM. This carries the same weight and meaning as the regular IM MOC. All credentialing boards that recognize the ABIM MOC in IM will recognize the FPHM.

Is the FPHM MOC More Rigorous Than the Regular IM MOC?

Yes, and it was intentional. It is recognized that hospitalists do things that make them “special” by acquiring and refining skills learned experientially outside of a supervised training program. Thus, one can attain FPHM board designation only after three years of practice as a hospitalist. The problem is that this is largely unsupervised time (unlike a fellowship), so the threshold to ensure we have achieved a level of competency has to be established through the MOC process.

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