John Nelson: Your Hospital Should Use Scripts to Describe Hospitalists to Patients

John Nelson, MD, MHM

My anecdotal experience (no scientific research data) has convinced me that nearly every patient has some or all of the following questions or concerns when admitted by a hospitalist for the first time:

  • Why is my usual doctor (PCP) not going to be in charge of my hospital care?
  • Is the hospitalist a “real” doctor or someone in training, and whatdoes my regular doctor think of the hospitalist?
  • Does the arrival of the hospitalist mean my long-term relationship with my PCP has been severed and I’ll see the hospitalist for all care (inpatient and outpatient) from now on?
  • How will the hospitalist know my medical history, and will she communicate with my PCP?

Ideally, all communication about the hospitalist as an individual and the whole system of hospitalist care should help answer these questions and reassure the patient. Sadly, many people at the hospital unwittingly do the opposite.

Unintentional Undermining of Patient Confidence

Despite good intentions, doctors and nurses at the hospital often describe hospitalists to patients in a way that undermines the patients’ satisfaction and confidence in the hospitalist. They may say something like: Your doctor (PCP) doesn’t come to the hospital anymore and we have these doctors who are here all the time called hospitalists. I’ll ask one of them to see you.

To a patient, this might sound like he’s getting just any old doctor who happens to be around with nothing to do, rather than someone who specializes in the care of hospital patients and comes highly recommended by his PCP. The patient is left wondering why their “regular doctor” isn’t in charge of the hospital care, and often suspects the PCP has terminated their relationship or has been forced to refer by an insurance company when, in fact, the PCP chose to refer. Misunderstandings like these are a recipe for less satisfied and less confident patients.

Most hospitalist groups have a brochure explaining their practice, which addresses all of these points. (A simple Internet search for “hospitalist brochure patient information” or similar terms will reveal a number of good samples.) However, some patients never get a copy, and many won’t read it. So just having a brochure isn’t enough; there needs to be a way to ensure that all verbal communication serves to enlighten and reassure the patient.

Despite good intentions, doctors and nurses at the hospital often describe hospitalists to patients in a way that undermines the patients’ satisfaction and confidence in the hospitalist.

Scripts for Nurses and Non-Hospitalist Physicians

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